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Girl Scouts to Talk with Astronauts on International Space Station


Macedonia, Ohio – Girl Scouts of North East Ohio (GSNEO) collaborating with NASA Glenn Research Center’s Space Communications and Navigation Office presents an out-of-this-world experience offered exclusively to Girl Scouts and their families. The event is set for June 23, 2017 at Camp Timberlane in Wakeman, Ohio. The event will take place 8:30am-2:30pm with the International Space Station Contact taking place at 10:25am.   Girl Scouts have submitted questions in advance for the astronauts and will speak in real time with astronauts aboard the International Space Station using Ham Radio technology.

Only a limited number of organizations get approved for an ARISS (Amateur Radio on the International Space Station) contact. The unique program, which promotes STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) skills, will be the main attraction for this activity-packed family event.  Guests will hear from NASA employees as well as Professor B. Curious from the Great Lakes Science Center.  Activities will be set up throughout camp and include a virtual reality tour of the International Space Station and the vacuum chamber, take-away stations like energy bead bracelets and straw rockets, and an exclusive Girl Scout ARISS contact patch.

 

 

What is ARISS?


ARISS is a joint venture by NASA, the American Radio Relay League (ARRL), and the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation (AMSAT) to facilitate communication via Amateur Radio between astronauts aboard the International Space Station and schools and communities around the world. ARISS programs excite and motivate students in a one-of-a-kind presentation and exchange.

ARISS program goals are:

·         Inspiring an interest in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) subjects and in STEM careers among young people.

·         Providing an educational opportunity for students, teachers, and the general public for learning about wireless technology and radio science through Amateur Radio.

·         Providing an educational opportunity for students, teachers, and the general public for learning about space exploration, space technologies and satellite communications.

What is Amateur Radio?

Amateur, or “Ham,” Radio, is a popular service and hobby in which federally licensed participants operate communications equipment. There are over 700,000 licensed amateurs and nearly 2,300 ARRL-affiliated Amateur Radio clubs in the United States. Hams talk to each other across town, around the world, and even into space without the need for normal communications infrastructure, such as cell phone networks or the Internet. Amateur Radio is regularly used during natural disasters to help local emergency and served agencies (such as the Red Cross, Salvation Army, and state and local governments) respond when normal communications methods are disrupted. The Amateur Radio community is a great source of electronics experimentation, public service, and fun.

More information on the ARISS program can be found at www.arrl.org/ariss.
More information on Amateur Radio can be found at www.arrl.org/what-is-ham-radio.